Insects & other Arthropods David A Kendall   BSc PhD
E-Mail: kendalluk@aol.com
Order Araneae (True Spiders) Class: Arachnida

Like all arachnids, spiders differ from insects in having four (instead of three) pairs of legs and in having only two (instead of three) distinct body regions - a hard front part called the cephalothorax (or prosoma) and a soft hind part called the abdomen (or opisthosoma), which are joined by a narrow stalk called the pedicel. Spiders are fairly uniform in their general appearance and are so well known to most people that there is probably little or no difficulty in their general recognition and overall distinction from most insects and other arthropods.

Cave Spider
Meta menardi - Cave Spider
b. up to 15 mm
Walnut Orb-weaver Spider
Nuctenea umbratica - Walnut Orb-weaver Spider
b. up to 14 mm (Photo: B. Quinn)
Garden Spider
Araneus diadematus - Garden Spider
b. up to 13 mm
Missing Sector Orb Weaver
Zygiella x-notata - Missing Sector Orb Weaver
b. up to 7 mm
Wasp Spider (female)
Argiope bruennichi - Wasp Spider (female)
b. up to 15 mm (Photo: H. Brooke)
Wasp Spider (female)
Argiope bruennichi - Wasp Spider (female)
b. up to 15 mm (Photo: H. Brooke)
Comb-footed Spider
Enoplognatha ovata - Comb-footed Spider
b. up to 5 mm
Nursery Web Spider
Pisaura mirabilis - Nursery Web Spider
b. up to 15 mm
House Spider
Tegenaria sp. - House Spider
b. up to 16 mm (Photo: D. Hagon)
Tubular Web Spider
Segestria florentina - Tubular Web Spider
b. up to 22 mm
White Death Crab Spider
Misumena vatia - White Death Crab Spider
b. up to 11 mm
Synaema globosum
Synaema globosum - a Crab Spider
b. up to 8 mm (Photo: S. Hyde)
Philodromus sp.
Philodromus sp. - a Crab Spider
b. up to 6 mm
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